REO CRAGUN

 

Reo Cragun was raised in Vancouver, Washington, by two single mothers (his own mother and his aunt), during the incarceration of his father that would last until Reo Cragun’s high school graduation. During this stage of his life, he excelled in academics, achieving full scholarships for universities in Washington, eventually pursuing his degree in Biology in the hopes of becoming a doctor. Simultaneously, he honed his musicianship that began early in his youth, picking up a new instrument to learn every year since the second grade until he could play violin, trumpet, guitar, piano, and more. However, midway through college, unexpected situations forced him to drop out. While he was working in the produce section of Costco, destiny realigned his path — it was through a network of connections that began with a coworker at Costco that Reo Cragun met his eventual manager, Dee.

After hearing a clip that Reo Cragun had recorded the night before, Dee instantly understood the potential. A session was set up for later that same day. Dee looked Reo Cragun up and down, and listened to the part-time Costco employee’s ideas.

“You’re moving to LA,” said Dee. “You’ll be a star.”

Reo Cragun came to LA for glimpse of the situation, worked with a few big names, and then quit his job to begin his music journey.

His music’s thematics are influenced largely by his father’s incarceration, citing Eminem’s Curtain Call as a major impact owing to the way Eminem speaks about his daughter, establishing a bond between artist and listener that Reo Cragun felt profoundly, as if the rapper were a distant father figure capable of producing the fathers’ love that Reo Cragun lacked at the time. Similarly, he used 50 Cent’s Get Rich or Die Tryin’ to feel a connection to his father. Now, Reo Cragun is excited to launch his music career, one he builds on the comprehension of his emotions and the moments that have led to this precipice. He creates his music from a place of authenticity, whether it’s a melody or a beat, or a lyric — there’s no routine, only the creativity of the present moment.